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Purdue Food Science: Professor Wins Agriculture’s Nobel’

Nelson is known for inventing technology that allows processed fruits and veggies to be transported without spoilage. Aseptic bulk storage and distribution revolutionized global food trade.

According to the World Food Prize Foundation, more than 90% of the estimated 24 million tons of fresh tomatoes worldwide each year are aseptically processed. They can be repackaged year-round into various food products.

Each year, the foundation recognizes individuals who have made a difference in improving the availability, quality or quantity of food around the world. The World Food Prize was established in 1986 by Norman E. Borlaug (recipient of the 1970 Nobel Peace Prize). This award is known as the Nobel of agriculture.

Past prize winners have been responsible for innovations such as high-yielding hybrid rice varieties, a vaccine against cattle plague, a method to control food-damaging parasites and the concept Integrated Pest Management.

Nelson will be presented with his $250,000 award during the Oct. 18 World Food Prize ceremony, which will take place in Des Moines (Iowa).

Nelson stated, “It’s an honor pathways to science to have been recognized. It’s also very humble because of past winners.” This award recognizes Purdue Food science as well as Purdue University. Purdue deserves a lot of credit, as it was where I spent 47 years of my career.

“The aseptic technology would not have been possible without the support and facilities at Purdue.”

Martin C. Jischke, President of Purdue, called Nelson “one Purdue’s greatest sources of pride.”

Jischke stated that “His research in bulk aseptic processing is well-known throughout the world.” His career exemplifies the Purdue University mission: education, research, and engagement.

According to Randy Woodson (Purdue’s Glenn W. Sample Dean of Agriculture), consumers benefit from Nelson’s work every time that they go to a restaurant or supermarket.

Nelson is known for inventing technology that allows processed fruits and veggies to be transported without product spoilage. Aseptic bulk storage and distribution revolutionized global food trade.

According to the World Food Prize Foundation, more than 90% of the estimated 24 million tons of fresh tomatoes worldwide each year are aseptically processed. They can be remanufactured into different food products throughout the year.

Each year, the foundation recognizes individuals who have made a difference in improving the availability, quality or quantity of food around the world. The World Food Prize was established in 1986 by Norman E. Borlaug (recipient of the 1970 Nobel Peace Prize). This award is known as the Nobel of agriculture.

Past prize winners have been responsible for innovations such as high-yielding hybrid rice varieties, a vaccine against cattle plague, a method to control food-damaging parasites and the concept Integrated Pest Management.

Nelson will be presented with his $250,000 award during the Oct. 18 World Food Prize ceremony, which will take place in Des Moines (Iowa).

Nelson stated, “It’s an honor to have been recognized. It’s also very humble because of past winners.” This award also recognizes Purdue Food science. Purdue deserves a lot of credit, as it was where I spent 47 years of my career.

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